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Benneyan Joins Forces

May 10, 2010

Northeastern University (NEU) seeks to join the existing I/UCRC "Healthcare Organization Transformation (CHOT)" consisting of Texas A&M (TAMU) and Georgia Tech. TAMU is the lead institution of the proposed Center, and proposes to add an additional site (Penn State) in the next review cycle. 

Northeastern University (NEU) seeks to join the existing Center for Health Organization and Transformation (CHOT) as a third site. CHOT was established in 2008 to "conduct mixed methodology, applied research on the antecedents, execution, and effects of transformational interventions and strategies that combine evidence-based management, clinical and information technology innovations, and on-going organizational learning and cultural change" in healthcare systems. NEU will conduct applied research on solutions to problems of common interest to its member hospitals. The proposed site will work in the industry-academia interface to accelerate the application of systems engineering and related methods to profoundly impact the improvement of healthcare systems. NEU's long-term research thrusts focus on 6 core areas: safety and process quality, logistics, flow and access, efficiency and costs, system-wide optimization, and outcomes/effectiveness optimization. 

The proposed site aims to develop both graduate and undergraduate industrial engineering (IE) students experienced in identifying and executing useful applications of industrial engineering and operations to measurably improve healthcare systems. The NEU site has made significant progress to address diversity on its research team by working with its Minority Engineering program. The PI is also working with NEU's admissions office to identify potential participants in the "Yellow Ribbon" program (a modern version of the GI Bill) who could be appropriate for involvement in NEU's proposed work. NEU plans to disseminate knowledge through annual symposia, newsletters, website postings and journal publications.

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