When I decided to study chemical engineering at Northeastern University, I wasn’t exactly sure what I was getting myself into. At first I was slightly apprehensive, considering all the troubling remarks I heard regarding the difficulty of the curriculum and the amount of work involved with studying chemical engineering. My first concern was whether or not I would be able to have a satisfying and enjoyable college experience, or would I be stuck in the library every night studying while other students were off having fun, meeting new people, and experiencing new things. After five years of studying at Northeastern University and three co-op cycles in both industry and academia, I am delighted to say that in no way was my college experience lessened by studying chemical engineering. Even after many long nights spent in the library studying for exams and countless all-nighters in the design lab working on senior capstone projects, I can confidently say that I have no regrets about choosing chemical engineering and that I didn’t miss out on any college experiences. In fact, late nights spent studying for exams, completing projects, and getting homework done are part of any college experience no matter what you chose to study. These experiences, while slightly more frequent with challenging curriculums like chemical engineering, are vital to both your education and growth as an individual. And yes, there is still plenty of time to party, have fun, meet new people, get involved with student groups and organizations, and explore and experience the many amazing facets of both Northeastern University and Boston.

One of the major contributors to the superiority of the Chemical Engineering Department at Northeastern University is the faculty. Over the past five years, I have had the pleasure of learning from some of the brightest and most talented individuals I have ever met. The Chemical Engineering faculty at NU is comprised of a diverse group of engineers with areas of expertise ranging from polymer and materials science to drug delivery, tissue engineering, and microfluidics. The faculty is also extremely friendly, outgoing, encouraging, and helpful. The fact that a faculty with such a wide spectrum of industrial and academic experience and varying teaching styles can deliver a comprehensive and thorough education with a difficult curriculum like chemical engineering is a true testament to the strength of the Chemical Engineering Department at NU.

The education I have received studying chemical engineering at Northeastern University, coupled with the extraordinary and unparalleled experiences through the co-op program, have undoubtedly prepared me for any future challenges I may face and any endeavors I may choose to undertake. Even during economically challenging times and with a struggling job market, my education and experiences at NU helped me land the job I wanted prior to graduation. I have been working at a small start-up biotech company based out of Cambridge for over three months now, and I can confidently and happily say that my experiences studying chemical engineering at NU made the transition from an undergraduate student to a practicing engineer rather seamless. I am confident that there are no other chemical engineering programs that can compete with the education delivered through both a comprehensive curriculum and vital co-op experiences. I strongly urge anyone who is considering engineering to consider the Chemical Engineering Department at Northeastern University.

Academic Success: 
  • 2010 National SACHE Student Design Competition for Safety in Design Winner
  • 2010 National Student Design Competition Honorable Mention
  • 2010 President's Award Recipient
  • 2010 Calvin S. Cronan Award Recipient
  • 2010 Sears B. Condit Award Recipient
  • 2009 President's Award Recipient
  • 2009 Northeast Regional ISPE Student Poster Contest Winner
  • 1st Place at 2009 National AIChE Chem-E-Car Competition
  • Dean’s Scholarship for Academic Achievement
  • Dean’s List (2005-2010)
  • Academic Achievement Award
  • Academic Achievement Scholarship
Co-op 1 and 2
Draper Laboratory and Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials

For his first co-op Crater worked in Draper Laboratory as a biomedical engineer. There he used GC/MS and Differential Mobility Spectrometry to develop a point of care diagnostic system. He also collaborated with researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center to investigate the use of SPME for identifying volatile metabolites from various species of bacteria. 

On his second co-op he worked at Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials. Here he furthered his skills in chemical engineering while designing and performing experiments using electroless nickel plating and light-induced silver electroplating on photovoltaic cells. He also prepared, analyed and maintained nickel and silver plating baths and used various microscopy techniques.