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Get the Scoop on your Second Year!

Congratulations on successfully entering your second year at Northeastern! Let’s reflect a little on what you have learned thus far: you no longer get lost on campus, you’ve figured out the best times to go to Rebecca’s to avoid lines, and you have rubbed the Husky’s nose for good luck. Great! So what does your second year include? This year is the perfect time for you to continually develop your academic and career goals. But no worries! You have many hands to support and assist you on this journey! As you continue to familiarize yourself with all Northeastern has to offer, take advantage of the resources on this site.

Academic Strategies

  • Prepare for Lecture:
    • Read before class
    • Print out and fill in powerpoints and other study guides
    • Take notes as you read
    • Manage your health and wellness: Sleep 8-9 hours each night and eat 3 meals a day
  • Attend Lecture:
    • Pay attention and understand what's going on
    • Take notes and highlight information
    • Eliminate all distractions
    • Arrive to class on time and bring course materials, including textbooks, notebooks, and pencil
    • Ask questions and engage in lecture
    • Sit in the “T”: front or center rows of the class
  • Review and Refine Lecture Notes:
    • Re-read and re-write your notes from class
    • Study with a classmate to compare notes
    • If studying in a group, put everyone's notes in one large document before the exam
  • Utilize Resources
    • Study Groups:
      • Utilize large spaces for your study group
      • Assign a specific topic to each person
      • Ensure everyone knows what is being studied during your session
    • Tutoring:
      • Find a tutor that fits your learning style and attend tutoring sessions regularly
    • Professors:
      • Bring questions and practice problems to professor office hours to gain clarification on course material
  • Weekly Review and Study New Material
    • Connect how all lectures tie into each other
    • Understand how to best utilize your learning style
    • Study in groups weekly
    • Keep up with assigned readings
  • Review 1 Week before Your Exam
    • Create a personal study guide by combining all of your notes per class
    • Thoroughly summarize each topic
    • Study a different way each day
    • Rewrite study guides provided by the professor in your own words
    • Manage your work to be sure you allow for appropriate time to study
  • Exam
    • Review with classmates before exam
    • If confused, ask for clarification
    • Don't rush during the exam!
    • Exam taking tips sheet
  • Review Exam
    • Ensure you understand areas that need improvement before the cumulative final
    • Learn information rather than memorizing. Focus on how exam topics connect
    • Build a series of practice exams to better prepare
    • Complete practice exams multiple times to solidify knowledge

Adapted from MCPHS University, Academic Resource Center 2014

COE Resources

  • Meet with your academic advisor to discuss courses you should enroll in each semester to keep you on track for graduation, learn about summer session courses, and receive referrals to on-campus resources to assist in your overall success. Learn about Undergraduate Student Services, your academic advisor, and the flexible curriculum guides.
  • Create a connection with your professor. Bring questions or practice problems to your professors' office hours to further comprehend information. Review each syllabus to discover when each of your professors is available to meet.
  • Take advantage of your TA to learn from the student perspective. TAs are students who have successfully completed the class prior and are providing additional assistance to YOU! You can also learn more about their experience within their engineering discipline, both inside and outside the classroom.
  • Attend Roadmap to Success workshops to hone in on your academic skills. Free pizza is served at each event.
  • Upper-class tutors are assigned to courses to assist in your success. These students have been selected by faculty to support your understanding of the material. View the tutoring page to enhance your comprehension of course concepts.

Newsletters

Year Two @ NEU newsletters are emailed to second year students on a bi-weekly basis during the academic year. Each includes valuable information to encourage second year success including important dates, academic strategies, reminders of campus resources, workshop opportunities and more! Below see the archive of all Year Two @ NEU newsletters. If you are interested in contributing to the newsletter, please contact Erin Schnepp, Academic Advisor, at e.schnepp@neu.edu.

Second Year Check List

  • Meet with your assigned academic advisor prior to fall, spring and summer registration to discuss your academic plan
  • Monitor your degree audit using your curriculum guide, and pay attention to requirements that are in-progress or unsatisfied
  • Explore minors, inside and outside of engineering, to enhance your major and career goals
  • Investigate study abroad options
  • Continue to connect with Career Development to improve resume writing, interview skills, and to learn more about internships, job opportunities, career fairs and workshops
  • Get connected with Northeastern by joining College of Engineering student clubs and organizations, and University-wide student clubs and organizations participating in campus events
  • Strengthen relationships with faculty in order to prepare for letters of recommendation
  • Check your Husky email and Blackboard daily to stay informed of important university deadlines and events
  • Consistently view the COE website for updates and events

Study Space

Every student learns differently, therefore, the University provides a variety of study spaces for students. Do you prefer to study with friends? In silence? With a little bit of noise? Check out the links below to learn more about study spaces available to you on our campus.

  • The Northeastern University Library provides ample space for students to study, dependent on their learning style. You can also gain assistance from research librarians, view archives, and print necessary documents. Reserve a group study room to review course material with classmates.
  • Snell Engineering Center has three computer labs: 208, 268 and 274. Take advantage of these labs to assist with your homework and to prepare with classmates.
  • Depending on the time of day, various classrooms on campus may not be occupied. It is encouraged to study in an open classroom, if available. Take a quick walk around campus to find a classroom that will satisfy your studying needs!

Words of Wisdom from Fellow Husky Engineers

  • Julia Antoniou, Mechanical Engineering 2017
    • Branch out of Northeastern area and explore Boston. There’s some really awesome food and activities, either for free or for really cheap outside of the immediate area of Northeastern. A good example for food, the strip of restaurants on Peterborough St. in the Fenway area. Lots of variety of food choices and they’re all delicious. A good example of an activity that’s pretty cheap is kayaking on the Charles. Will only cost you $15 and you’ll get some awesome views.
    • Try to find a group of people in your major/pattern of attendance that you can choose classes with and study with.
  • Jenna Bilsback, Chemical Engineering 2017
    • Update your resume actively so it’s easier when you apply to co-op.
    • Make time to have some fun.
    • Join an academic club, it’s a great way to get to know faculty and upperclassmen.
  • Clarissa Danif, Mechanical Engineering 2018
    • Always read the material ahead of time, always. This enables the student to participate in class discussions and understand the new material being taught. The student will be better off in class, have a great participation grade, and makes it so the student won't procrastinate with homework.
  • Alyssa Gang, Electrical and Computer Engineering 2018
    • Follow your passions and the rest will come naturally. Many do activities or take on research labs or extra work they don’t actually enjoy because it “looks good on a resume.” Don’t fall into this trap! “If you do something you enjoy you never work a day in your life.”
    • Everyone gets stressed sometimes. UHCS or your RA can be a great resource. There are also meditation classes offered through the school.
  • Savannah Greenly, Industrial Engineering 2017
    • Don’t be afraid as a second year to go out for new clubs! Just because you missed an opportunity your first year doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get involved!
  • Mackenzie Heiser, Industrial Engineering 2017
    • Make an effort to walk the city. The T/buses can only show you so much when it comes to what Boston has to offer.
    • Learn how you study best. Everyone’s mind is different so some things that work for others may not work for you.
    • Practice presentations in the mirror or in front of friends.
  • Georgia Houghton, Chemical Engineering 2018
    • If you take a bus within 30 minutes of taking the T, it’s a free transfer!
    • You can get almost any academic journal through Snell library.
    • Find an activity that allows you to de-stress. It’s easy to get overwhelmed with academics in the second year when classes start get harder.
  • Alex Krisiewicz, Chemical Engineering 2017
    • I know co-op seems scary but your advisors can make it easy and exciting so don’t get too stressed.
    • Make sure you make time for friends & hobbies. Your classes will start to pick up and you’ll need some stress relief.
    • Get to know your professors and tutors they can help you more than you think.
  • Emily Korot, Civil Engineering 2017
    • Join a student group, you will make great new friends.
    • Visit office hours and get to know your professors.
    • Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself. Always try to be outgoing and friendly.
    • For co-op, be willing to learn new things.
    • Be yourself and have fun!
  • Nicholas Leclerc, Mechanical Engineering 2018
    • Don’t stop meeting new people after freshmen year. Everyone is on a different schedule and networking is invaluable.
    • Don’t let co-op stagnate your life. Day-in day-out can be tough but never stop learning, socializing and being better.
    • Mental and physical health are a priority! School is important, but remember to take breaks to take care of yourself.
    • Weekdays are workdays, make sure to stay on top of your work—even on weekends—to avoid Sunday night cram.
  • Perri Lomberg, Electrical Engineering 2019
    • Do something fun and that makes you happy. Save time for yourself pursuing something outside of your major.
  • Emily Maresco, Chemical Engineering 2018
    • Definitely find good study groups, I did almost all of my homework with my friends from my classes. This was extremely helpful.
    • During your free time, do fun things! Don’t sit in your room watching Netflix by yourself! Grab some friends and go explore Boston! Maybe go to a museum, there are a bunch close by that you can go to for free or get a discount with your student ID.
    • Don’t limit your friends, make as many friends as possible. Having more people to talk to/hang out with is a great way to have fun and maybe meet even more people.
    • Don’t procrastinate! Get stuff done earlier rather than later.
  • Raashmi Patalapati, Chemical Engineering 2018
    • Don’t be scared to reach out to a former co-op that had your job. They will know the most about the whole experience.
    • Don’t be scared to make your own co-op. Lots of engineering companies take co-ops but are not necessarily affiliated with Northeastern. Ask around!
    • Go abroad! It will change your viewpoint on everything around you and it will be the time of your life. Go twice if you can.
    • Take care of yourself. Sleep. Eat your veggies. Go to Marino.
  • Kim Perrone, Civil Engineering 2018
    • Many students get nervous if they don’t hear from employers within the first couple days. Try to keep calm; some companies just interview later than others and just because you haven’t heard back yet, doesn’t mean you’re not a good candidate.
  • Liam Rolle, Mechanical Engineering 2017
    • I would say one of the things that helped me learn NU really well was joining an e-board. While it might be an easy assumption that all these positions go to upperclassmen, a surprising number of e-board members are sophomores (excluding roles like President or VP). It allowed me to connect with other club leaders as well as now hold a leadership position in an organization. Additionally, the 2nd year is your last "free" year in terms of a semi-reasonable work load after which it gets significantly harder to time manage etc.
  • Ellie Schachter, Industrial Engineering 2017
    • When applying/interviewing for co-ops, show your personality. Employers want to hire a person, not a resume.
    • Join clubs that make you want to go every week. You can always make new friends!
  • Rachel Shaffer, Mechanical Engineering 2017
    • Get involved in clubs and become an Executive Board Member!
    • Go off campus at least once a week. Boston is beautiful.
    • Go to new restaurants.
    • Don’t wait till the last minute to perfect your resume.
  • Taylor Skilling, Electrical and Computer Engineering 2017
    • Continue meeting new people, stay involved in organizations and try new ones. Apply for leadership positions early, at least ask to shadow an Eboard member - It’s never too early.
    • Get out and explore the city: Lawn on D, Cambridge, North End, Jamaica Plain, Back Bay.
    • Think about housing for your 3rd year sooner rather than later. If you are going off campus, then most leases open up in January (for a Sept. 1 move in date). It's important to know your budget, who you will live well with (not necessarily your best friend), what location you're interested in, what you want vs. what you need, and to keep looking and not take the first apartment you see. You can avoid Realtor fees by knowing the current occupants and going directly through them.
    • I recommend attending all recitations, even if optional, if you can. Usually they provide better insight onto what material is important and building a relationship with TAs is important for both grading (they may be the ones doing it) and to have a resource who can answer questions outside of class (you can shoot them an email and they are more likely to answer even if it's a weekend, not office hours)
    • If you are interested in anything, which everyone is, whether it be snowboarding, robotics, dance, band, whatever it is, get involved early. Take a position, make a position, something as simple as PR (Twitter, Facebook) or if you are comfortable, an Executive Board position, as club positions are both fun and look great on your resume.
    • Spend the money to invest in a good pair of dress shoes, a suit, a blazer, a few pairs of nice slacks, quality button down shirts and a few ties for interviews, events at work, whatever it is. It's not impossible to be overdressed, but it's better to look too formal than under dressed, especially for an interview or the first few days on your first coop. First impressions are everything during interviews and your dress reflects that.
    • Communication is the most important thing in life. From asking questions in class to forming study relationships with classmates to being able to voice your questions and concerns with coworkers. Always keep in contact with your supervisor, check in with them in the morning, go out to lunch with them, be social. They will become a valuable asset well past your coop. If you feel you have made a mistake, tell your supervisor. Never lie, be honest, mistakes happen.
    • Take responsibility for your actions and if you're on time, you're late. Plan to there at least 5 minutes before you're scheduled.
    • Try and understand yourself. Know what you're good at, and get good at talking about it. Recognize your weaknesses and do what you can to not let those affect your performance.
    • Practice interviewing with someone or yourself. Think of questions you may be asked and prepare answers beforehand. Preparedness really shows in an interview.
  • Carl Uchytil, Mechanical Engineering 2018
    • Try to build a relationship with your professors so that you can easily ask them for help in a class or even use them as references.
    • Join an engineering student group – it’s great networking and looks good on a resume.
    • Look for co-op’s that can develop skills that you don’t yet have.
  • Kyle Varela, Civil Engineering 2018
    • Join student clubs – especially some non-engineering ones. Your life will be filled with engineering work, so it’ll be great to have a break from that and explore other interests and hobbies.
    • Get to know your professor by participating in class and office hours.
    • Get the phone numbers of people in your class. It makes homework and studying way easier.
  • Colin Vincent, Electrical and Computer Engineering 2018
    • Explore Boston! Go out and take the T or walk around. The best reason to go out is for food. No matter how you get there you’ll become more comfortable in the city by going somewhere new. This will also be very helpful on coop. If you have an interview to get to around the city or outside of it, knowing your way on public transportation makes it much easier!
  • Bryce Wynn, Electrical Engineering 2018
    • Every semester comes with a mulligan. At the end of my first year I realized I wasn’t enjoying myself, so I changed almost everything. I joined new clubs, spent time with a different group of friends and a different set of classes to boot. And life got a lot better. It’s important to remember you aren’t locked into anything here, and every semester can be a fresh start if you need it.